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Poster Presentation Descriptions

"Functional Improvement in Chronic Global Aphasia" (15 minutes)
M. Hunter Manasco, PhD, CCC-SLP/Lesley Puckett, BS
Description: Patients with nonfluent aphasias are at high risk for post stroke depression. In particular, those with severe global aphasia are at greatest risk and have the worst prognosis for long-term recovery. Depression is associated with decreased functional communication (Fucetola, et al., 2006) and is known to negatively influence an individual’s ability to learn. Both of these factors are likely to reduce recovery levels from aphasia in the acute stage (up to 2 wks). Unfortunately, the acute stage is when most aphasia therapy is delivered.  This is a second retrospective qualitative single case study using family and clinician report, information from diagnostic evaluations for aphasia and depression, triangulated with session-to-session therapy data. This single case study shows functional improvement in an individual with global aphasia in therapy years post stroke after the reported remediation of depression.
Objectives:
-Describe the potential effects of depression, anxiety and stress on recovery in aphasia
-Identify how to screen for depression in those with potential depression

"Functional Improvement in Chronic Broca’s Aphasia Following Reported Remediation of Depression" (15 minutes)
M. Hunter Manasco, PhD, CCC-SLP/Carly Chittom, BS
Description:
  
The prevalence of depression among the population of people with aphasia, particularly severe nonfluent aphasias (Robinson & Benson, 1981), is higher than among the general population (Pompon, et al, 2019). Depression is associated with decreased functional communication (Fucetola, et al., 2006) and is known to negatively influence an individual’s ability to learn. Both of these factors are likely to reduce recovery levels from aphasia in the acute stage. Unfortunately, the acute stage is when most aphasia therapy is delivered. 
Furthermore, research continues to indicate that significant recovery from aphasia is possible further and further out from the traditionally conceived 3-6 month recovery period (Holland et al, 2017). As early as 1980 some researchers were acknowledging that recovery for certain individuals with global aphasia was possible well after 6 months and up to 3 years (Samples, 1980). So further significant recovery from severe nonfluent aphasia may be possible for many in the subacute (2 wks to 6 mos) and chronic stage (>6 mos) of aphasia if depression was present at the acute stage and has since been alleviated.  This is a retrospective qualitative single case study using family and clinician report, information from diagnostic evaluations for aphasia and depression, triangulated with session-to-session therapy data. This single case shows functional improvement in an individual with chronic Broca's aphasia years post stroke after the reported remediation of depression.
Objectives:
-Describe the potential effects of depression, anxiety and stress on recovery in aphasia
-Describe how the timing of therapy delivery during the acute stage may not be optimal for some patients with post stroke depression

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